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whylupus

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 #1 
Has anyone's Rheumatologist ordered Turmeric to you?  I've been researching it and, it sounds like there is some great benefits?  Check out this information. I found it on Amazon.com but, I haven't talked to my rheumatologist yet. 
http://healthremediesjournal.com/top-10-health-benefits-of-turmeric/?utm_source=turmeric&utm_medium=turmeric&utm_campaign=google&gclid=CjwKEAjwwcjGBRDj-P7TwcinyBkSJADymblTwvEQSLOs1oNSsM0QhIEA5sypRSAGSWSEaHUk0N4NLRoCq8Hw_wcB

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whylupus

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 #2 
Here is the better link. Sorry posted the wrong one first. 
http://www.turmericforhealth.com/turmeric-benefits/turmeric-benefits-for-lupus

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taffylinden

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 #3 
Several years ago, I read a lot about turmeric and decided to give it a try. (Nope, didn't tell me rheumatologist first for some stupid reason. I wasn't as smart as you are!) I took turmeric capsules (ordered from Amazon) for a month. i didn't notice any big difference, but the stuff I read said it could take a couple of months, so I ordered more and took them another month, by which point I was sure they weren't working. I was disappointed.That doesn't mean they wouldn't work for anyone else. Just my experience.

Rheumatologists don't get excited about herbal supplements because few go through clinical trials. But I did go to that website, even though name showed it'd probably be biased. I was further concerned when a pop-up offered me choices of turmeric for breast cancer and turmeric for quick weight loss. But the site referred to a clinical study, so I looked up THAT. The study was tiny, and it basically had to do with certain properties of curcumin, a component of turmeric, that led the study's authors to HYPOTHESIZE it might be beneficial to lupus patients. That study was published in 2013. There have been no published studies since that I could find. (Your rheumatologist would know.)

Look for studies that are
large-scale (thousands of patients)
double-blind (neither patients nor medical personnel know who's getting a placebo)
and repeated--in case the first study was flawed

Maybe somebody else here had a good experience with it. If your doc gives the go-ahead, and turmeric helps you, I hope you'll let us know. Best of luck!


Sky

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 #4 
I would work with your rheumatologist with any herbal medications you are thinking about trying. You can see a holistic doctor who can work with you to balance the meds and herbals. Unfortunately, many insurances do not pay for integrative medicine. Any alternatives such as acupuncture, massage therapy, nutritional supplements, etc. really should be offered to everyone.
I would definitely talk with your doctor. Although doctors in the past were not trained in holistic medicine; they are finally getting on board w/ teaching the aspects of body, mind and spirit.
I take turmeric in a low dose in capsules and cooking with it as well as a few supplements. My doctor is aware of them.
Baker1

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 #5 
In my experience, some of the younger doctors seem more open to the use of alternative medicine. But like Sky said, insurance doesn't pay for them. But always check with your doctor before trying something new.
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whylupus

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 #6 
Thanks for your replies, I've been researching everything! I'm determined to find an answer! The sicker I get, the harder I search! I've learned that, the sun is def. a problem for me. I get a headache and achy joints on my best days being in the sun just a few minutes. I enjoy photography and have realized my photography lights cause me to flair too so, my favorite hobby is also off limits! My brand new studio that I spent my nest egg to build is a waste! Although my celiac antibodies are not positive, I'm almost certain that gluten is causing me to flair! I thought that once I was being treated the flairing would stop! I was reading the goal is reduce flairs to three a year??? I flair almost daily I don't think I've stopped for five years now! I have better days with lesser symptoms but, I feel like some new problem happens everyday!
I'm on 16 medications a day now! I know they are helping but the side affects down the road is scary!
Just wish there was something natural!

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clgrover

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 #7 
It's my wife who has Lupus but I have been eating ginger and turmeric for years. I have osteo-arthritis. I cannot take aspirin or other NSAIDS. Tramadol messes up another medication I take for BPH. I use ginger and turmeric because they are mild anti-inflammatories. Most days I put about 1/2 teaspoon each of powdered ginger and powdered turmeric into a cup of broth (I like half beef or chicken broth and half tomato or vegetable juice) or add the stuff to soup or stew. I also use a prescription medical food called Limbrel 500, made from plant material to concentrate flavonoids. It calms down nerve endings in arthritic joints. Double-blind tests show it as effective as naproxen sodium. It is expensive. Medicare dropped it from their formulary early last year. BUT the distributing drug company has had plans to purchase it at a greatly reduced price. So among these alternatives, plus heat, topical lidocaine, P.T., exercise, and most importantly rigorous taijiquan (Northern Wy Style) I get by. I have recently added chiropractic. It is early in that regimen but may be helping.
whylupus

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 #8 
Thank you for this reply..
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Dmgentry79

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 #9 
I take turmeric curcumin capsules daily while I'm waiting on my rheumatologist appointment and after a few weeks I have noticed a slight improvement in joint inflammation and pain. Mind you, when I have a moderate to bad flare up, it's still the same old pain and stiffness and difficulty with mobility but the in between days are definitely a little easier to handle. Just my personal experience. Of course, what works for some doesn't work for all... And I ran this by my PCP since I'm waiting to be seen my a rheumy, first.
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