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taffylinden

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 #31 
Txgirl, was it his out of pocket or his deductible?  Out-of-pocket is usually the max someone pays for co-payments. That's another thing I don't like about insurance companies: monthly premiums AND deductibles AND co-pays.

I moved from Wyoming last year. Texas and Wyoming are two of the states that  refused to expand Medicaid. I don't know about Texas, but in Wyoming it was done strictly for political reasons. People in those states really got hosed. Blame those states or blame Obamacare, but it's much better in the state I'm in now. I couldn't afford insurance on my own back there--one reason I moved after retirement.  

I'm on Blue Cross now, and my payment is about the same as it was in 2016. That surprised me because some years back when I was on BC through my employer, our premiums went up every year. I was told that was routine for BC.

I think we all agree there are many problems with Obamacare. What I don't want is to return nothing. Nothing wasn't working so well before. And the health care policy of a nation as great as the United States should never become, "S u c k s to be you."
Baker1

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 #32 
I was on Blue Cross, and only paid my copay at the doctor and paid a percentage until my out of pocket was met. But Blue Cross has now pulled out of Obamacare in Wisconsin.
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TXgirl

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 #33 
Your right it was his deductible. Either way he couldn't afford it. I agree I hope something better is presented. I think it will. I know more people without insurance now than before. Sad.
Baker1

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 #34 
It sounds like Congress is just going to make some changes to Obamacare and not totally throw it out completely. I guess we will just have to wait and see.
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taffylinden

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 #35 

Well, as we all know by know, the new GOP healthcare plan, the American Health Care Act--has been introduced to the House of Representatives and fast-tracked to a vote. I've read dozens of articles summarizing it and even tried to slog through the 123-page Act. Here are the provisions most likely to affect those of us here:

Pre-existing conditions: STILL COVERED! I know we're all relieved. Hopefully everyone has heard the GOOD NEWS that pre-existing conditions will still be covered. Big sigh of relief here! However, experts expect a wider array of policies that will offer less coverage.

Forced participation: The individual mandate--the controversial requirement that Americans have to purchase health insurance or pay a penalty--is essentially gone. (Pause for cheers.) However, and this is important, anyone with a gap in coverage of 63 days or more in the 12 months BEFORE the AHCA kicks in (2020) will have to pay a 30% surcharge on monthly premiums for a full year. 

     WHY: Healthy young adults are necessary to keep the pool afloat, so to speak. Instead of penalizing those who opt out of insurance coverage, the AHCA hopes to get and keep them in the pool by penalizing them if they leave AND RETURN. 

     BOTTOM LINE: If you opted out of coverage, make sure you get coverage before 2019 and keep it!


Medicaid: If you're on disability, or if you and your children are on Medicaid, you may not like this part. The AHCA caps the amount of money the federal govt. will pay per eligible person. States will have to make up the difference. In financially strapped states, that would probably mean a reduction in coverage. 

Age AND Income: At first glance, I thought the AHCA would work well for me. The tax credit I'd get would be bigger than the vouchers I'd received under Obamacare. But the bill allows companies to charge older customers FIVE TIMES what a twenty-something would pay. That would eat up all the tax credit and then some. I don't think I could afford insurance if that's the case and am very worried about this. But that's me. Hopefully, you'll be better off. Below is a link to a site that will help you figure how much you'll get in tax credits under the AHCA and compares it to how much you got in vouchers under Obamacare.  Keep in mind, though, that it's only about credits, not about coverage or expenses.

Will the AHCA make it through the Senate? (It's expected to pass in the House as early as today.) That's iffy. Most experts estimate the ACHA would leave 10-11 million Americans without coverage. Four GOP senators have said they won't vote for the AHCA for that reason. Two of them would have to change their minds for the Act to have a shot at getting passed by the Senate.

Stay tuned!


kff.org/interactive/tax-credits-under-the-affordable-care-act-vs-replacement-proposal-interactive-map/



Robinj

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 #36 
Again Taffy, thanks so much for explaining it. Very helpful!
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Cakelady

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 #37 
I started the tread because I worry about the people on here who with Obamacare finely got insurance. I was worried that it would be taken away and was trying to open up a dialogue that people could express their fears or concerns.

Some of us are better informed on these issues or understand them better then others. I am not afraid to admit that I need somethings explained to me

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Cakelady

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 #38 
Are you talking to me
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Clye D. Clown

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 #39 

"I remain just one thing, and one thing only, and that is a clown. It places me on a far higher plane than any politician."

Charlie Chaplin

taffylinden

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 #40 
 Clye, your profile pic is creeping me out. You're not going to go all John Wayne Gacy on us, are you? 
Clye D. Clown

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 #41 
You mean Pogo?

yikes....even clowns are creeped out by THAT guy.
Cakelady

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 #42 
Clyde just behave while on the forum. And no picking on bun. That's a no no
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Mr. Bun

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 #43 
CupCake.......that goofy looking.....ah....Clyde?

He doesn't even rate a spot in the cedar chest lol.  He's stuffed in the back of a closet, under "you know who's" smelly laundry hamper.  The Lady   Annes were seriously weirded out by him....so......he is under.....the...ah.....undies.

no worries about him messin' with the Bun.  me & moo changed the password.  (well...she did.......and thought i wasn't lookin'....she's pretty dense sometimes lol......don't rat me out)

forever & humbly your Bun

xox

Cakelady

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 #44 
Clyde kinda scares me
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taffylinden

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 #45 
Back to health care: Today the Congressional Budget Office estimated that 14 million Americans would be uninsured if the American Health Care Act becomes law.What is the CBO? It's a strictly nonpartisan (no political affiliation whatsoever) part of the Congressional branch of our government. Its job is to analyze how enacting legislation would impact the country financially. They're highly regarded, meticulous,and thorough. Actually, the report is worse than that: by 2026, the CBO estimates, 24 million Americans would be uninsured. 

The GOP is hoping the bill will reduce health care costs and trim $373 billion from the federal budget. The idea is that by lifting the requirements for what health insurance policies must cover, there will be more policy choices and lower prices. Opponents argue this simply means there'd be that many more choices, all cruddy. 

Stay tuned. 
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