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swimpal

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 #31 
I have but nobody has called back for an interview .
Robinj

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 #32 
Well, seeing as I don't know where you are or your background, it's hard to make a suggestion. Keep looking and best of luck!
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When the first baby laughed for the first time, its laugh broke into a thousand pieces, and they all went skipping about, and that was the beginning of fairies. [Tinkerbell]
swimpal

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 #33 
Thanks Robinj
Robinj

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 #34 
You are very welcome. Wish i could help more.
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When the first baby laughed for the first time, its laugh broke into a thousand pieces, and they all went skipping about, and that was the beginning of fairies. [Tinkerbell]
taffylinden

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 #35 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeBartolo

“There isn't a job in this world without stress”

well, wouldn’t mind being a tenured professor [smile]


Believe me, Anthony, they're stressed, too. I used to be married to one, worked as an adjunct professor for several years, and still have friends who are professors. Tenure doesn't mean you can't be fired; it means you can't be fired at will, and even then there are exceptions. Most college profs earn less than most K-12 teachers, sad to say. There are departmental and college politics, stacks of essays, too many committee assignments, and the constant pressure to "publish or perish." 

But there must be SOME low-stress dream jobs out there! Taster in the Ben and Jerry's factory?
DeBartolo

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 #36 
thanks taffylinden  — long ago i was an adjunct faculty member at 2 different universities myself (2 different subjects too), so i do know the lay of the land & how the 'business' works …. based on that, i’ll still take tenure & the substantial protection it offers - especially for any research done which is socially, politically, or scientifically controversial.

that’s the stress-free part for me  …  being free to think & research whatever i want  [smile]





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HerOuchness

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 #37 
Good luck on the job hunt. A change might do you good. If you're able to function - keep functioning. I can tell you from experience that disability is almost impossible to get. It's a myth that it's "easy" and that people "get rich" from it.  It takes forever, it's a painful process, it never keeps up with the rate of inflation (so you'll be extra poor in less than ten years), and it's truly a last resort for a reason! 

I had no choice in the matter. I was flat on my back with kids to feed. One day I was functioning...and several painful days later - I wasn't functioning at all.

So, do what's right for you. Reduce stress where possible (work change) and also work on changing the way you respond to stress (that was a big one for me). Because, as the ladies/gents here have said: there's no such thing as a stress-free life. Meditation helps, as does consciously reacting: As in, someone says something insensitive: Instead of flying of the handle...I CHOOSE to realize they just don't understand and not react. That takes practice, patience, and not being on steroids [rofl] JK about the steroids thing...but it sure does help not to be!
CntryGrl66

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 #38 
I know for a fact that my job will be causing flare-ups.  The stress of the long commute as well as certain co-workers that don't understand and don't know the pain someone with Lupus has.  I'm struggling every day but I keep going because I need to work.  I've been looking for jobs close to where I live and haven't had any luck.  What now?
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Annie  [smile]
Dx'd October 2, 2015
Early Stages of Lupus
Aussie

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 #39 
G'day Annie,
Keep working & keep looking is my advice to you. I chose not to tell my work colleagues of my 'unwelcome lodger' just didn't want to be labelled as unwell & treated differently. Life is full of stress, whether you are well or not. I think it is very important to keep working if you can. Hopefully you may find work closer to home.
Cheers.....
CntryGrl66

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 #40 
Hi Aussie .... I intend to keep working until I find something.  Just to be nice and out of respect, I let my colleagues know that I have Lupus.  Maybe I shouldn't have said anything.  I get the feeling that when I don't feel good and I call in, they don't believe me.  They know that lupus is manageable but what they don't know is the pain that a person with lupus goes through.  They have no idea.  There is an issue with my attendance at work.  I had my first flare up before I got diagnosed and I felt like I was beaten with a bat.  I was out at least a day or two almost every week and I was struggling the other days to get up and go to work.  I can't afford not to work because I have a family to support and I'm a single mom so my income is the only thing we rely on.  How can you go to work feeling like that?  And how do you deal with colleagues that maybe think you're not telling the truth?  It's very frustrating and I feel like I have to explain myself all the time.  The good thing is I have an interview with my local county which if I get the job, my commute will be only 20 min one way as oppose to 1 hour and 15 min one way now.  I don't plan on telling my "new job" about my hidden torture.  But what I'm worried about is what happens when I have a flare up?  Isn't at some point they should know?  How has everyone dealt with work and managing their lupus?
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Annie  [smile]
Dx'd October 2, 2015
Early Stages of Lupus
Cakelady

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 #41 
I would be up front with them. Honesty is the best policy. I used to get up hours before I was due at work to take my time getting ready and resting in between getting ready. Then I would commute to work take a quick nap then go in and at lunch another nap. Then home and mom duties

You have to ask yourself. Does lupus have me or do I have lupus. You just have to try and think of other ways to do things and find time to rest. It was my boss who noticed when I started to go down hill. And she was my biggest supporter.

Good luck

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The bond that links our true family is not one of blood, but one of respect and joy in each other's life
CntryGrl66

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 #42 
I have started to incorporate naps into my work day.  I go in really early to work and sleep in my car 1 hr 30 min then go in to work.  Then at lunch time, I sleep.  The question I get now is, "Why do you come in so early?  You're crazy for coming in that early!"  And they already know why!!!!  It irritates the heck out of her that I come in so early.  She says she understands but I really don't think she does.
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Annie  [smile]
Dx'd October 2, 2015
Early Stages of Lupus
Cakelady

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 #43 
If you don't look sick they don't understand. They may say they understand but they don't. I went in early everyday and took a nap and got teased. But there came a time when people realized how sick I was and things changed. Give it some time Just do what you need to do to get through the day.
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The bond that links our true family is not one of blood, but one of respect and joy in each other's life
sunshine

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 #44 
I am not sure if I would leave my job which is something I am contemplating. I was diagnosed with lupus after my second child was born 23 years ago. In the past I have been able to manage it. Yet,now I am tired most times and just go through the motions of the day. I recently had my second hip operation 2 months ago. From that moment on my energy level has decreased. I am on a low level of predisone(5mg). Anything higher tends to bloat me up and make me feel hungry. I am already a "healthy size"(smile). I am kind of worried this time around because i can usually bounce back with in a weeks time. My energy has been zapped the length of my medical leave(5 weeks)......Are any of us rich enough to quit a job!
sweetlee

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 #45 
When it comes to employment always put your own personal health and well being first. Ask for accommodations that are a win win for you and your employer. Try to have as much savings as possible, so that if an employer is stressing you out too much you have coverage until the next gig.

In an interview, be sure to ask specific questions about the average number of hours each week, lighting, sun exposure. Try to get inside information to find the reality of the day to day, turnover rate, etc. If healthy people are leaving left and right, you may not want that job.

With the AHA, being a freelancer can be a good option. Just be sure your contracts allow someone else to be your backup when you're sick or need to rest.

Take care

Sweetlee
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