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Anamarie

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 #1 
I'm a 24 yr old female working 36-44 hrs a week at my current job as a CNA for a homehealth agency. I do go to school and am a year away from applying for a nursing program as I do plan on becoming a nurse. Anyone out there working while having lupus or did you change profession?
DeBartolo

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 #2 
welcome to the board  [thumb]

over the yrs we've had quite a few RNs here as members, as well as a few students who show up & i think ask the same sort of question that you just did....basically, did i bite off more than i can chew professionally because i'm sick?

not knowing anything else other than what you wrote, i'd say only your body will be able to tell you that.

but, yes, there are people who come down w/ SLE that also have hard jobs, such as nursing, and do look for a lighter load  ....but a lot of people just stay put & try to get their employer to offer a little slack.

IMHO, if you want to be a nurse, be a nurse. [thumb]

best.




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Baker1

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 #3 
If I were you I would go and become a nurse. If you find that it isn't going to work out for you, you can always go back to school.

I worked in the food service industry for several years then ended up in a factory. Lost my job due to lay-offs and not lupus, but it probably kept my body from totally falling apart these last 2 years. I'm in school now majoring in Health Information Technology and I am almost 50 years old.

Good Luck.

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Diane M
"I was chasing my dreams, but tripped over reality and busted my head on the truth."
neazea

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 #4 
I am currently a CNA with Lupus (was diagnosed in 2009).  I actually became a CNA due to my flare up with Lupus.  I wanted to be in the healthcare field and help people.  I'm now going back to school to be an Occupational Therapist.  I choose the OT route because I know how risky it is to work so much and I felt that this profession I can do what I love but it can be more managed.  I considered nursing briefly, then got scared to death knowing I wouldn't be able to handle the long hours and the stress, as that is my trigger.  Know your triggers or what makes you feel worse.  Good luck!
Cattibree

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 #5 
I just got CMA (AAMA) certified and I've had SLE since 2011. I just took it easy with my classes; one to two a semester. I have faith that you can do it too.
Akfireweed

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 #6 
I'm a 29 year old CNA and have been for 10 years doing private duty skilled care. I try to take it easy and 3 days a week I do the exercises and workouts with my client, keeps me moving and also motivates her. Despite my love for helping people, I am however thinking of changing jobs, something not so demanding. The stress from her guardian doesn't help me and chilly mornings taking her to appts is hard on my lungs. But everyone is different, and if you love what you're doing then keep at it and keep working your way up the ladder. And like Neazea said, know your triggers.
steffaneykthomas

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 #7 
I am currently a nurse and was recently diagnosed with SLE. I have found that some units are incredibly challenging (ICU) and other units are much better on my body. I also am not able to do overnights or 12 hour shifts. Right now I am able to do 8 hour shifts (about 2 times a week). Thankfully my employer is working well to accomadate but it has been a huge struggle. With a healthy body I would love my previous jobs in ER and ICU. I'm very thankful for the ADA. 
Patrick

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 #8 
Welcome to the world of lupus. My wife has her BSRN and the got her masters after the age of 50. I am bragging but she deserves it. Anyway she does not have SLE but there is such a shortage of RNs that I am sure you can do many things that don't require CNA type duties. Get your Associates degree RN then go for the BS if you can. As you know a lot of hospitals will pay for the school if you promise to work at their facility forever....NAAAA, just a year for a year usually. If God has called you to be a nurse then that is definitely what you should do. Of course if money has drawn you to nursing I will give you the same answer. Some people are religious and I am giving you extra incentive and strength to go for it.
    I worked in an E.D. but had a private, occupation specific, disability policy. I had some neurologic issues etc. and because I was 50 I went for the disability policy. I had 25 years in medicine and my diagnosis was delayed. I honestly don't know what I would have done if a diagnosis and treatment had been started earlier in the game. Patrick

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meg

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 #9 
To add on to what Patrick said about the Associates degree, one of my sons is finishing his Associates in nursing at the end of this year.  He already has a CNA/student nurse job at Loyola Medical Center here in Chicago.  They are going to pay for his BSN, but only if he goes to Loyola University. I don't think they'll have to twist his arm.  Since he's been a CNA for a while, the clinical's are a breeze for him.  Eventually he wants to go into Peace Corp and then teaching.  I think You would have a much easier time in school since you've been a CNA, which of course will be better for you in terms of your lupus.  After that, the field is wide open to you, and you may get something that isn't as physical as a CNA.
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